All of our group homes and apartments are HUD subsidized units, thus providing affordable housing to adults with a mental disability.

Community Villa, Quincy, IL – 15-bed group home for adults who have a serious mental illness.
Community Manor Apartments, Quincy, IL – 10 unit apartment complex providing safe, affordable apartment living for adults who have a serious mental illness.

2015 CILA Group Home

2015 CILA Group Home, Quincy, IL  – 11-bed group home for adults who have a severe developmental disability.
St. Anthony Road Group Home, Quincy, IL – 6-bed group home for adults who have a developmental disability.
Hillcrest Manor Group Home, Quincy, IL – 6-bed group home for adults who have a developmental disability.
Spruce Street Apartments, Quincy, IL – 15-unit apartment complex providing safe, affordable apartment living for adults who have a developmental disability.

Read a Success Story

Tom* is 21 years of age and is developmentally disabled (DD). Tom lived with a caregiver who was unable to provide him with the support and supervision that he needed. As a result, Tom’s life was chaotic, lacked stability, and he often did not have the basic necessities. He associated with people who were unsavory and often put himself in situations that were dangerous. Prior to his coming to Transitions, he had been assaulted by neighborhood teens.

Case management staff in our DD programs assisted Tom in accessing funding so that he could live at our St. Anthony Road Group Home. There, he would live safely, with the support and supervision he needed. When Tom moved into St. Anthony’s, he had no money with which to purchase needed items, such as clothing and furnishings for his room. Transitions assisted him in getting some “start-up funds” so that he could get the items he needed. He was able to get a bed, dresser, and desk for his room at St. Anthony’s. He was thrilled to have a room of his own … and was so proud of his new room at the group home.

With the support of Transitions’ staff Tom has learned many new skills – he has learned grooming and hygiene skills, how to do laundry, and how to prepare a meal. He relates well to the other residents and has “blossomed” with the support he has received. Staff believe that in the near future he may be able to live in his own apartment in the community with supports.

This is an actual story of a person served at Transitions. Names have been changed to protect the consumer’s identity.